Uniting the Northern and Southern Traditions

Although sudden and gradual are different,
At the time of achievement they are one.
Why distinguish between north and south?
Sages and commoners temporarily differ,
But their basic natures are the same
Whether they are from the east or the west.

~ Ven. Master Hsuan Hua

Having traveled to Thailand and Burma in his youth to investigate into the Southern Tradition of Buddhism, the Venerable Master was set to heal the two thousand year old rift between the Northern (Mahayana) and Southern (Theravada) traditions. In America, the Venerable Master encouraged cordial relations between the Sangha communities from both the Northern and Southern traditions. As always, he would set an example by leading the way. For example, on the occasion of the opening ceremony for the Dharma Realm Buddhist University, he presented Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda of the Southern Tradition with an honorary Ph.D. The Master would also invite Bhikshus from both Traditions to jointly conduct the High Ordination. The Master's noble efforts in this area culminated in the historic meeting of Sangha members from both the Northern and Southern traditions at the Amaravati Buddhist Centre in England in 1990.

During the various ordination ceremonies held at the City, the Venerable Master would extend special invitations to distinguished Bhikshus from both the Northern and Southern traditions to jointly conduct the Ordination Ceremonies





During the various ordination ceremonies held at the City, the Venerable Master would extend special invitations to distinguished Bhikshus from both the Northern and Southern traditions to jointly conduct the Ordination Ceremonies.



Sangha members from both the Northern and Southern traditions unite at the Amaravati Buddhist Centre in England, 1990

Sangha members from both the Northern and Southern traditions unite at the Amaravati Buddhist Centre in England, 1990.



 
Mutual exchange between the Northern and Southern traditions at the City of Ten Thousand Buddhas in 1991.




In May 1991, the Amaravati Buddhist Centre in England sent senior monk Ajahn Amaro as a representative to make offerings of robes and almsbowls to the Sangha led by the Venerable Master. This ritual symbolized an exchange between the Northern and Southern traditions, writing a new page in the history of Buddhism.